How to Press a Latte Mug Using The New BJ870 4-in-1 Mug Press!

The new 4-in-1 mug press machine is here to stay! Just like the older BJ860 model, the BJ870 is an improved version that features four different heat elements that fit a variety of mug styles including the standard 11 oz. mugs, 15 oz. mugs, and large and small latte mugs. Among our favorites are ceramic latte mugs and pressing them is easy!

Follow this step by step guide on how to press our 17oz latte mug with our multi-function mug press. 

Materials You’ll Need

Use the long latte element for the 17oz mug!

Set your mug press temperature and time to allow the machine to heat up! Slide the blank mug in the heating element and test the pressure. It is best to do it now rather than later when you have your design taped to the mug. For the latte mug, use the following settings:

Temperature: 330° F
Time: 240 seconds
Pressure: Medium

Because of the shape of these mugs, we recommend using this template to set up your design.

While your press is heating, line up your mug to the printed paper. Use thermal tape on each edge to secure the design.

 

 

 

 

 

Once the temperature has reached 330°, place the mug in the heating element and pull the handle towards you to “close” it. Push the round, red button on the right side of the press to activate the timer.

NOTE: A drop in temperature is normal and should not affect the transfer process.


After 240 seconds, the mug press will start beeping to let you know the mug is ready to be taken out. Press the red button again to stop the beep and reset the machine. You may use gloves to handle the mug but that’s not necessary. The mug handle is usually not hot and can be easily held while peeling away the paper.

Make sure to peel the paper right away! As long as the mug is still hot and the paper is on it, sublimation is still occurring.

The final result should be a beautiful image transfer without any faded areas.

Share your mug designs with us on social media! Tag us in your posts with @costalbusinesssupplies and use #InspireMeCoastal. We might share your products on our social media helping you grow your online audience.

Pick Your Poison: The Accessories of Heat Pressing

People have been asking about when they should be using certain accessories. Mainly Nomex vs. foam, silicon vs. teflon, and when a teflon pillow is best used. So let’s break down each item and find out their strengths and weaknesses.

Nomex Felt Pads

Nomex is a material found in a great deal of heat resistant safety gear. This makes it an ideal material to help cushion you Substrate. The material is incredibly dense and can withstand a great deal of compression and still bounce back. This means you can place it into your shirts, onesies, hats and other gear to help even out those seams without worry. It is also cutable so you can custom cut the pad to whatever substrate you are using. There are a few downsides to this potion_bottlesimgmaterial, one is that it does absorb sublimation ink, which means it can the re-release that ink onto whatever substrate you’re using. This leads us to another weakness, its price. A great product does come at a price, which makes this a costly yet worthwhile replacement if it gets ruined.

Foam Pillows

Foam pillows are an inexpensive alternative to the Nomex pads. Now while they can perform a lot of the same roles that the Nomex they do lack in the amount of bounce back due to not having the same density that the Nomex does. They also have the absorption problem that the Nomex has. Though, at the low cost of this product and the wide variety of sizes they are a must have for any shop.

Teflon

Teflon sheets are great multi-tools. They protect your top plate when using opaque transfers and keep ink off your bottom platen during sublimation. They also give you that little added weight when placing transfers on shirts, which also means it, will keep your sublimation sheets down and help eliminate ghosting when bringing the platen up. The Teflon also has the nice bonus effect of adding a glossy effect to your heat transfers. Simply place it over your shirt after pressing and press for an additional 10 seconds.

Silicon Sheets

Silicone sheets have many uses, including protecting images during heat pressing, avoiding sublimation ink bleeding onto your heat press or bleeding between fabric layers. A silicone sheet can be used multiple times (approximately 5-10 times) until you feel that is no longer usable from either discoloration or ink coverage. Silicon sheets also have the ability to add a matte finish to your heat transfers. Simply place it on the image after pressing and press again for about 10 seconds.

Heat Presses – Making Sense of all the Available Options

blog_heatpressesThere are multiple heat press manufacturers and several options from each, resulting in lots of different choices when selecting a heat press that is right for your business. In this article we will explore the four main characteristic differences that you need to be knowledgeable about to determine which heat presses might be right for your needs.

  • Clam Shell or Swing Away (Bonus – Draw Presses too!)
  • Manual or Auto Release
  • Standard or Air Operated
  • Small Format or Wide Format

Continue reading “Heat Presses – Making Sense of all the Available Options”